latimes:

Voyager 1 has officially left the solar system

It may have taken 36 years of coasting through space, but the Voyager 1 spacecraft has entered interstellar space, becoming the first man-made probe to reach that far-off realm.

The scientific community has been debating whether Voyager had already left for some time now, but it wasn’t until today that NASA was confident enough to made the estimate official.

Lead author Don Gurnett, an Iowa State plasma physicist and a Voyager project scientist, said the data showed conclusively that Voyager 1 had exited the heliopause — the bubble of hot, energetic particles that surrounds our sun and planets — and entered into a region of cold, dark space called the interstellar medium. 

Read more over at Science Now.

Photos: NASA

azert ez eleg meno!

futurejournalismproject:

The White House responds to the Death Star Petition
In response to a petition at We the People, Paul Shawcross, Chief of the Science and Space Branch at the White House Office of Management and Budget, writes:



Even though the United States doesn’t have anything that can do the Kessel Run in less than 12 parsecs, we’ve got two spacecraft leaving the Solar System and we’re building a probe that will fly to the exterior layers of the Sun. We are discovering hundreds of new planets in other star systems and building a much more powerful successor to the Hubble Space Telescope that will see back to the early days of the universe.



Besides, he adds, “The Administration does not support blowing up planets.”
Well played. Very well played.

Oké, unalmas Obama kommunikációs stábjának sztárolása, de ez akkor is jó volt. 

futurejournalismproject:

The White House responds to the Death Star Petition

In response to a petition at We the People, Paul Shawcross, Chief of the Science and Space Branch at the White House Office of Management and Budget, writes:

Even though the United States doesn’t have anything that can do the Kessel Run in less than 12 parsecs, we’ve got two spacecraft leaving the Solar System and we’re building a probe that will fly to the exterior layers of the Sun. We are discovering hundreds of new planets in other star systems and building a much more powerful successor to the Hubble Space Telescope that will see back to the early days of the universe.

Besides, he adds, “The Administration does not support blowing up planets.”

Well played. Very well played.

Oké, unalmas Obama kommunikációs stábjának sztárolása, de ez akkor is jó volt. 

discoverynews:

There are many reasons to buy organic foods, but it would seem health benefits is not one of them.
Organic Not Necessarily Better for You

Researchers found no major evidence that one type is healthier than the other in measurements like nutrient content, allergic response or infection rates.
Some research did show differences in pesticide levels of conventional foods and of children that ate them, but even conventional produce came in way below allowable safe limits.

keep reading…

discoverynews:

There are many reasons to buy organic foods, but it would seem health benefits is not one of them.

Organic Not Necessarily Better for You

Researchers found no major evidence that one type is healthier than the other in measurements like nutrient content, allergic response or infection rates.

Some research did show differences in pesticide levels of conventional foods and of children that ate them, but even conventional produce came in way below allowable safe limits.

keep reading…

discoverynews:

Creepy and beautiful in the same moment.

arpeggia:

Animals in the Womb

They may grow to be very different beasts, but these breathtaking images reveal how surprisingly similar the beginning of life can be for the animal kingdom. Captured using revolutionary four-dimensional imaging technology and anatomically accurate models, scientists have managed to shed light on the world of mammals inside the womb. As diverse a bunch as they are - elephant, dog, dolphin and penguin are all shown united by their similar stages of development.

Scientists captured the images for a National Geographic Documentary called ‘Animals in the Womb’. The images were also used on a Channel 4 documentary ‘Animals in the Womb’ which aired in 2009. They were created by using a combination of ultrasound scans, computer graphics and small cameras -as well as some carefully created models- to document the animals’ development from conception to birth, and give an unparalleled glimpse into a world that few of us would ever expect to see.

[via dailymail.co.uk]

!

ka-steve:

discoverynews:

Miami Cannibal Attacker: What Are ‘Bath Salts?’
The recent story of a Miami man, 31-year-old Rudy Eugene, who went on a naked rampage, attacking a homeless man and chewing off his face before being shot dead by police, has caught national attention because of the horrific nature of the crime. The news has also brought to light a drug that has since mostly escaped national attention, a narcotic that apparently goes by the street name, “bath salts.”
Given the grisly and bizarre nature of the events that unfolded on May 26, it’s almost certain that this drug will merit a closer look by police and public health authorities.
keep reading

Srontinak.

Na, ilyen lenne a minimum egy új drog leírásánál, sajnos ez elég ritka, pedig nem túl bonyolult ezeket az infókat begyűjteni. Ez alapján ez a cucc csak egy a dizájnerdrogok közül, jön-megy, valószínűleg hamarabb betiltják majd, mint a többit, és lesz helyette másik hasonló. 

ka-steve:

discoverynews:

Miami Cannibal Attacker: What Are ‘Bath Salts?’

The recent story of a Miami man, 31-year-old Rudy Eugene, who went on a naked rampage, attacking a homeless man and chewing off his face before being shot dead by police, has caught national attention because of the horrific nature of the crime. The news has also brought to light a drug that has since mostly escaped national attention, a narcotic that apparently goes by the street name, “bath salts.”

Given the grisly and bizarre nature of the events that unfolded on May 26, it’s almost certain that this drug will merit a closer look by police and public health authorities.

keep reading

Srontinak.

Na, ilyen lenne a minimum egy új drog leírásánál, sajnos ez elég ritka, pedig nem túl bonyolult ezeket az infókat begyűjteni. Ez alapján ez a cucc csak egy a dizájnerdrogok közül, jön-megy, valószínűleg hamarabb betiltják majd, mint a többit, és lesz helyette másik hasonló. 

futurejournalismproject:

If Your Brain Was a Hard Drive How Much Information Would it Hold?

Via Slate:

In its latest taunts directed at South Korea, North Korea’s state-run media has called South Korean President Lee Myung-bak “human scum” and an “underwit with 2MB of knowledge.” How many megabytes should a human brain be able to store?

A lot more than two. Most computational neuroscientists tend to estimate human storage capacity somewhere between 10 terabytes and 100 terabytes, though the full spectrum of guesses ranges from 1 terabyte to 2.5 petabytes. (One terabyte is equal to about 1,000 gigabytes or about 1 million megabytes; a petabyte is about 1,000 terabytes.)

The math behind these estimates is fairly simple. The human brain contains roughly 100 billion neurons. Each of these neurons seems capable of making around 1,000 connections, representing about 1,000 potential synapses, which largely do the work of data storage. Multiply each of these 100 billion neurons by the approximately 1,000 connections it can make, and you get 100 trillion data points, or about 100 terabytes of information.

Neuroscientists are quick to admit that these calculations are very simplistic. First, this math assumes that each synapse stores about 1 byte of information, but this estimate may be too high or too low. Neuroscientists aren’t sure how many synapses transmit at just one strength versus at many different strengths. A synapse that transmits at only one strength can convey only one bit of information—“on” or “off,” 1 or 0. On the other hand, a synapse that can transmit at many different strengths can store several bits. Secondly, individual synapses aren’t completely independent. Sometimes it may take several synapses to convey just one piece of information. Depending on how often this is the case, the 10-to-100-terabytes estimate may be much too large. Other problems include the fact that some synapses seem to be used for processing, not storage (suggesting that the estimate may be too high), and the fact that there are support cells that might also store information (suggesting that the estimate may be too low).

Now, I don’t know about you but it’s this last bit about processing that interests me. I’m not so concerned about the total amount of data my brain can hold. Instead its access — and the speed of access — to the data.

In other words, it’s RAM, drive speed and overall CPU that my brain needs an overall boost in. That and a spell checker. — Michael

100 terrabájtnyi iinó, és mégis szinte mindent elfelejtek, valami nem klappol. 

discoverynews:

Camera Trap Images Tell Anti-Poaching Success
Camera trap photo stills and video footage suggest that anti-poaching  efforts in the forests of Thailand are paying off, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society.
The cameras, set up at several locations across Thailand’s Western Forest Complex over the last year, have captured tigers, Asian elephants, gaurs,  sun bears, and many other species in off guard moments. Video footage  shows a tigress and  her cubs feeding on an animal carcass, leopards  marking their territory  with scent, wild pigs nursing their young, and  even Asian elephants mating.
more (with video) here

GMH

discoverynews:

Camera Trap Images Tell Anti-Poaching Success

Camera trap photo stills and video footage suggest that anti-poaching efforts in the forests of Thailand are paying off, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society.

The cameras, set up at several locations across Thailand’s Western Forest Complex over the last year, have captured tigers, Asian elephants, gaurs, sun bears, and many other species in off guard moments. Video footage shows a tigress and her cubs feeding on an animal carcass, leopards marking their territory with scent, wild pigs nursing their young, and even Asian elephants mating.

more (with video) here

GMH

yahoonews:

Hedy Lamarr: heartbreaker, actress, mother of wireless technology:

A new biography from Pulitzer Prize-winning author Richard Rhodes explains how former  actress Hedy Lamarr, once considered “the most beautiful woman in the  world,” was actually a prolific inventor, providing the U.S. Navy with  the blueprints for the wireless technology behind cell phone networks  and GPS.
Rhodes told NPR that Lamarr was bored by the Hollywood social scene and  had set up a  drafting table in her house and launched a sideline as an inventor. When  German submarines began attacking civilian passenger cruise liners,  Lamarr and her co-inventor George Antheil, came up with the idea of  “spread-spectrum radio” to remotely control torpedoes:

“She understood that the problem with radio signals was  that they could be jammed. But if you could make the signal hop around  more or less randomly from radio frequency to radio frequency, then the  person at the other end trying to jam the signal won’t know where it  is,” he says. “If they try to jam one particular frequency, it might hit  that frequency on one of its hops, but it would only be there for a  fraction of a second.”

Lamarr and Antheil received a patent for their idea in 1942 but the  Navy was lukewarm to the idea, leaving it untouched for years. 

(Photo via Wikipedia)

yahoonews:

Hedy Lamarr: heartbreaker, actress, mother of wireless technology:

A new biography from Pulitzer Prize-winning author Richard Rhodes explains how former actress Hedy Lamarr, once considered “the most beautiful woman in the world,” was actually a prolific inventor, providing the U.S. Navy with the blueprints for the wireless technology behind cell phone networks and GPS.

Rhodes told NPR that Lamarr was bored by the Hollywood social scene and  had set up a drafting table in her house and launched a sideline as an inventor. When German submarines began attacking civilian passenger cruise liners, Lamarr and her co-inventor George Antheil, came up with the idea of “spread-spectrum radio” to remotely control torpedoes:

“She understood that the problem with radio signals was that they could be jammed. But if you could make the signal hop around more or less randomly from radio frequency to radio frequency, then the person at the other end trying to jam the signal won’t know where it is,” he says. “If they try to jam one particular frequency, it might hit that frequency on one of its hops, but it would only be there for a fraction of a second.”

Lamarr and Antheil received a patent for their idea in 1942 but the Navy was lukewarm to the idea, leaving it untouched for years. 

(Photo via Wikipedia)

discoverynews:

Blood From a Stone? No. Blood From Rice? SureResearchers say they have found a way to produce and harvest large quantities of a blood protein from grains of rice.
Read more

Vérrizsnél kevés furább szóval találkoztam még. 

discoverynews:

Blood From a Stone? No. Blood From Rice? Sure
Researchers say they have found a way to produce and harvest large quantities of a blood protein from grains of rice.

Read more

Vérrizsnél kevés furább szóval találkoztam még. 

discoverynews:

ilovecharts:

How people in science see each other (created by @biomatushiq)

Everyone is a little MacGyver, no?

discoverynews:

ilovecharts:

How people in science see each other (created by @biomatushiq)

Everyone is a little MacGyver, no?

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